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- Part 8

Author Archives: Jake - Page 8

JAWS – Darkest Waters Script

JAWS – Darkest Waters Script

by N.

JAWS: DARKEST WATERS is a sequel, principally, to ‘Jaws’ , but acknowledges de facto the events in ‘Jaws 2’.

In as much as ‘Jaws 3’ and ‘Jaws – The Revenge’ refer to the character of Martin Brody subsequent to the events of the first two movies, and creates ongoing storylines for members of the Brody family subsequent to the events of the first two movies, these subsequent events will be treated as not having occurred for the purposes of the JAWS: DARKEST WATERS storyline.

BLACK SCREEN

The SOUND of a WHIPPING WIND, blowing off the sea.

FADE IN:

1 HIGH / LONG AMITY CEMETERY EXT. DAY

It is a cold, crisp, brilliantly lit Spring day. Amity Cemetery is situated atop a bluff overlooking the ocean.

We are joining a nearly completed burial service. The HIGH / LONG SHOT is DOWN THROUGH the newly budding branches of a tall tree, TOWARDS a funeral party of fifteen people (MOURNERS), their backs to us, who stand in front of a freshly dug grave. From this distance, A TOUCH OUT OF FOCUS, none of the MOURNERS are recognizable to us.

A PRIEST, an open Bible in his hand, FACES TOWARDS CAMERA from the far side of the grave. Behind him, the crystal blue ocean – filling the BG panorama of the SHOT – twinkles beyond the edge of the high bluff.

Everyone’s clothing and hair is blown by the crisp wind.

As the PRIEST speaks, so the CAMERA begins to MOVE LOWER DOWN (STILL SHOOTING THROUGH THE BRANCHES OF) the tree.

PRIEST
And so we say farewell to Laurence Vaughan:
husband, father, mayor, neighbour, friend.

The long journey is over. Rest in peace.

The PRIEST closes his Bible. The MOURNERS stand in reverential silence for a moment, then they and the PRIEST start to disperse: all except a man and woman, who continue to stand by the grave.

2 START LONG: MOVE IN

CAMERA MOVES IN FROM LONG TOWARDS the backs of the man and the woman who stand by the grave: he stares down into the grave.

The woman puts her arm comfortingly around the man’s shoulder, and turns her face towards him. We see now, that it is ELLEN BRODY (aged in her mid-sixties).

ELLEN
Are you ok?

The man does not turn to ELLEN; he continues to stare downwards. He nods slowly. We recognise Martin BRODY’s voice – now in his late sixties.

BRODY sounds distant, lost in thought.

BRODY
I’m ok. Look after Eleanor, I won’t be long.

ELLEN continues to look at her husband. She seems sad. She nods, turns, and begins to walk away.

3 HIGH / DOWN – TO GRAVE

FROM THIS ANGLE we now see into the gave in which the coffin lies. ELLEN is walking away OUT OF SHOT. BRODY – seen properly for the first time – continues to stare at the coffin. He looks old and tired.

4 FROM GROUND LEVEL UP ALONG CEMETERY PATH

The ANGLE is from the bottom of a gravestone, up the path. BRODY walks along the path TOWARDS CAMERA. He is looking ahead, but as he nears the (CAMERA POSITION) gravestone, he glances towards it, gives a sad, resigned sort of smile, and stops.

5 BRODY’S P.O.V

The gravestone reads:

Samuel John Quint – Born 1923, Died 1975

‘I must down to sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky.’

6 MED.CLOSE – BRODY

He stares down impassively for a moment, then quite unexpectedly a look of real anguish passes over his face. He sighs and shakes his head.

BRODY
(softly, to himself – he speaks ironically)
The journey’s over…

THE CAMERA MOVES AROUND WITH BRODY (CONTINUING TO FACE HIM), as he turns to face the sea. He has a look of unfathomable intensity, as he stares piercingly towards the ocean.

7 VERY LONG – THE OCEAN

Crystalline blue, wind swept, empty.

CUT TO:

BRIEF MAIN TITLES OVER A BLACK SCREEN – The words ‘JAWS: DARKEST WATERS‘ in rich blue on black. Contrary to what we might expect, there is NO MAIN TITLE MUSIC, no Williams coda.

CUT TO:


AFTER MAIN TITLE CREDITS, BLACK SCREEN.

BLACK SCREEN DISSOLVES TO WHITE SCREEN.

SLOWLY FADE IN:

8. BRODY’S P.O.V- BEACH-EXT.-DAY

THROUGHOUT, THE SHOT IS BLEACHED OUT, unworldly, uncomfortable.

SLOWLY FADING IN TO P.O.V, a nine year old boy stands in front of CAMERA / BRODY. The BOY is wearing swimming trunks and is carrying a yellow beach raft. He bears a strong resemblance to Alex Kitner: a character in the first movie.

The BOY is speaking to BRODY. His VOICE SOUNDS echo’y:

BOY
Mr. Brody…Mr. Brody…Can I swim now?

FAST CUT TO:

9. LONG – UNDERWATER

The UNDERWATER CAMERA RUSHES TOWARDS something in the murky distance, far ahead: at first, we cannot make out what it is.

The CAMERA RAPIDLY ARRIVES AT the shark. The BOY is clasped in the shark’s jaws. Blood is streaming and billowing from wounds in the BOY’s body. Shards of the yellow beach raft hang from the shark’s mouth.

The BOY is still alive. His underwater screams are hysterical, dreadful.

FAST CUT TO:

10. VERY CLOSE – BRODY’s CLOSED EYE

The closed eye blinks open. BRODY makes an AUDIBLE GASP. The pupil and iris of the eye is all jet black.

CUT TO:

11. MEDIUM – BRODY HOUSE (Sitting Room) – INT – DAWN

The Brody’s still live in the same beach-front house as they did in 1975.

The CAMERA MOVES AROUND the orange-hued, dawn lit, sitting room, with its wide bay window giving a panoramic view of the beach and ocean outside.

The MOVING CAMERA FINDS Brody’s desk – still positioned in the bay window overlooking the ocean.

MOVING ON, we catch a glimpse through the window of the jetty where the young Michael Brody once moored his boat.

MOVING ON, we FIND a black and white framed photograph on the wall: taken in 1975, of Matt Hooper (in a suit), and Brody (in uniform), and between them Larry Vaughan – all of them grinning – who is presenting them both with plaques of commendation.

MOVING ON, we FIND BRODY, sitting hunched on the sofa, staring at the floor, dressed in his T shirt and boxers. In his hand, he grasps a large scotch.

ELLEN (O/S)
Was it the same?

BRODY does not look up.

BRODY
Yeah…

12. WIDE

ELLEN, wearing a dressing gown, walks over to BRODY, sits down next to him, and puts her arm on his shoulder.

ELLEN
Why now…after all these years?

BRODY slowly looks up – ahead, not at ELLEN.

13. MED.CLOSE – BRODY

BRODY
Guilt.

BRODY gives a dark, humourless smile, and takes a shot of whisky.

CUT TO:

14. LOW / TRACKING – TOWN HALL – INT – DAY

LOW CAMERA TRACKS UP the centre aisle of the hall.

Up ahead, at the end of the aisle, a police officer SANDERS (aged 35), stands at a lectern. He is addressing the nine members of the town council, who sit behind a long table on a raised dais before him. SANDERS obscures the view of the chairperson, seated at the centre of the table.

The TRACKING CAMERA PASSES mainly empty chairs in the body of the hall – a few, not many, are taken by members of the public.

SANDERS mid-speech:

SANDERS
– two burglaries last summer, various breaches of civil
ordinance – again, during the season – and the incident
with a suspected felon last month.

14. MEDIUM: Dr Julie MENDEZ (aged 30) (A council member)

MENDEZ
(sardonically)
Who was a mere twenty-two years older than
the actual suspect.

15. MEDIUM: SANDERS

SANDERS
(irritated)
And had NYPD provided accurate information doctor,
we wouldn’t be discussing it.

16. ANGLE: MENDEZ

MENDEZ
Yes, but what this demonstrates –

(She is interrupted.)

17. MEDIUM: BRODY

BRODY is dressed in casual shirt and jacket. He is the chairman of the meeting.

BRODY
Is that even the police can make mistakes.

18. WIDE – THE COUNCIL MEMBERS

BRODY, at the centre of the council table, turns to MENDEZ who is further along the table. He gives her an ‘old fashioned’, whilst friendly, look. She takes the message.

19. O/S of SANDERS – FAVOURING BRODY

BRODY looks towards SANDERS.

BRODY
Thank’s Chief. We’ll take the report and come back
with any questions arising next time.

BRODY looks around the council members.

BRODY (cont.)
So, any other business ?

20. BRODY’s P.O.V – INTO THE HALL

SANDERS has sat down beside the lectern.

One of the few members of the public seated inside the hall is PETE, a sixty-year-old fisherman, who stands. (He looks bedraggled, stained. He stammers over his words. He is, what is sometimes euphemistically called ‘a bit simple.’)

PETE
Mayor. What about the fish ?

21. ANGLE ON COUNCILLORS – FAVOURING BRODY

BRODY
I’m sorry Pete, the fish?

22. LONG – MOVING TOWARDS PETE

PETE
Them fish ain’t there – out at the sound.

23. ANGLE – BRODY

Mayor BRODY has no idea what PETE is on about.

24. BACK TO PETE

They ain’t there, that’s all. They may come back.

25. BACK TO COUNCILLORS – FAVOURING BRODY

The councilors all look bemused.

BRODY smiles and nods at PETE.

BRODY
Alright Pete, thanks. We’ll take that under-

(BRODY grimaces and checks himself)

We’ll keep that on record.

CUT TO:

26. INTERCUTS – OCEAN – DUSK

Framed by a beautiful Spring sunset – many miles off Amity – members of a small school of bottle-nosed dolphins slowly swim in circles together on the red-glistening, calm surface. There are seven dolphins in all: five adults, two adolescents.

One of the group, a playful adult, leaps from the surface, arcs gracefully in the air, and dives back down; barely causing a ripple. Underwater, the playful adult dives deep then calmly heads back to the surface. He passes a shoal of slow moving mackerel, and various other languid fish that swim here and there.

27. SHARK’S P.O.V

MUSIC -the Williams coda – BEGINS.

From SHARK’S P.O.V, we are gliding relatively slowly in a straight line near the sandy ocean floor. At present, the underwater view ahead is clear of any other fish.

28. WIDE

Underwater, first to react, the mackerel dart off en masse.

29. SHARK’S P.O.V

P.O.V suddenly changes direction and begins to speed up.

30. INTERCUTS

On the surface, the hitherto peaceful dolphins suddenly dive. Underwater, they all head off together at speed.

31. SHARK’S P.O.V

P.O.V is getting faster. As yet, the underwater view ahead is still clear.

32. ANGLE ON DOLPHINS

The dolphins are speeding up. The two younger dolphins are starting to lag behind.

SOUND: some of the dolphins are now squeaking: a distressed version of their song. There is also an EVER INTENSIFYING SOUND of rushing water.

33. SHARK’S P.O.V

P.O.V is now very fast. The dolphins are now in view in the underwater distance.

34. ANGLE ON DOLPHINS

The SOUNDS of squeaking and rushing water have FURTHER INTENSIFIED. One of the adolescents has now lagging considerably behind the group.

35. SHARKS P.O.V

The SOUNDS are CACOPHONOUS. The lagging young dolphin is very close ahead. FAST P.O.V moves in until he it is right upon the dolphin’s tail.

FAST CUT TO BLACK SCREEN AND SILENCE: HELD BRIEFLY.

FADE IN:

36. INSERT

The INSERT is an EDIT of a sequence from ‘Jaws’: except it is TREATED to be BLEACHED OUT (like SHOT 8), and so that it FLICKERS INTERMITTENTLY FROM BLACK AND WHITE TO COLOUR.

First, the SHOT OF MRS KITNER (on the arm of an OLDER MAN) walking up the dock. In this VERSION it is in VERY SLO-MO. The SOUND of their footsteps are echo’y and exaggerated.

CUT TO the BRODY P.O.V SHOT – IN NORMAL SPEED – of MRS KITNER slapping BRODY.

FAST CUT TO:

37. MED.CLOSE – BRODY – BAR – INT. NIGHT

BRODY, sitting at the near deserted harbour bar, flinches as he comes out of his reverie. He is dressed casually; but differently to the Council meeting when we last saw him.

PETE is JUST OUT OF SHOT.

PETE (O/S)
They ain’t gone.

38. WIDER, THEN INTERCUTS

PETE, looking typically disheveled, stands a few feet away from BRODY at the bar. BRODY is still not quite with it.

BRODY
What d’you say ?

PETE
Them fish’re back.

BRODY snaps back to the present.

BRODY
Oh right. Your catch is better.

PETE
Out at the sound, yeah.

BRODY
That’s your ground?

PETE
Aye. We fished out there since pa was
a young’un.

BRODY smiles and nods. He is being friendly, but the conversation has reached a natural impasse. PETE though, just stands and stares back in his rather vacant way, so BRODY ploughs on:

BRODY
So it was tough going for a while ?

PETE
Tough ?

BRODY
The fishing was poor – bad.

PETE
Bad. ‘Appens though sometime – every cort’un.

BRODY
That’s to do with tides, right ?

PETE
Aye, cort’un tide.

At this, PETE suddenly nods decisively and, as is his way, just walks off. BRODY can’t help a smile.

BRODY (to himself)
See you then, Pete !

CUT TO:

39. LONG – TRAWLER – EXT – DAWN

A crisp, bright, cold dawn.

A small fishing trawler – of the stern ramp and net variety – is cutting gently through the swell. In the distant B.G, land is visible.

Two members of the three person crew, JIMMY (mid 30’s) and his sister NANCE (mid 20’s) are at the stern. NANCE sits on the metal casing where the ramp gearing is housed; JIMMY stands resting against the side of the boat.

40. ANGLE ON JIMMY AND NANCE

They are dressed for the cold weather. Both drink steaming mugs of coffee.

JIMMY (mid-conversation, grinning)
– but he says, “You hit me in the ear !”, right.

NANCE
Yeah !

JIMMY
Yeah, but – (interrupted)

An alarm bell linked to the net’s pulley and winch system goes off. JIMMY and NANCE both turn stern-wards, looking towards the ocean

41. LONG – NET ROPES

The net ropes, trailing off the stern a 100 metres, angled down into the ocean, look normal enough.

42. ANOTHER ANGLE

JIMMY (scowling)
D*mn thing, it’s bust.

NANCE turns to look at a torque gauge attached to the net system.

NANCE
It’s reading maximum ?

JIMMY shakes his head in bemusement.

JIMMY (calling to JACK)
Pa, ease down.

43. ANGLE TO BRIDGE

JACK (aged late 50’s) is at the wheel. The wheelhouse is open to the rear. JACK throttles down to idle, turns and calls down:

JACK
What’s the problem ?

44. ANGLE ON NANCE

NANCE (to JACK)
The gauge is on max.

45. ANGLE – JACK

JACK (dismissively)
God***n thing. It must be –

JACK goes quiet and takes on a more focussed look: getting more of a sense of the now stationary boat.

JACK (cont.)
There’s more pull.

46. ANGLE ON JIMMY

JIMMY
Might have snagged ?

47. BACK TO JACK

JACK
Nah, there ain’t nothing around here.

(He thinks for a minute, than calls decisively.)

Winch in.

48. WIDER ANGLE TO STERN

NANCE throws the net winch lever. The net starts to pull in.

49. ANGLE ON NET ROPE PULLEYS

The ropes are winding in, but are noticeably angled against the edge of the pulley, rather than just winding in straight.

50. ANGLE ON JIMMY

He places his hand against one of the winding-in net ropes. He calls to JACK:

JIMMY
There’s more weight alright.

51. TWO SHOT

NANCE
Must have gone through a shoal.

JIMMY
Great. We’ll be half a day up on the others.

JIMMY turns the ramp switch. The ramp lowers into the water. TENSION MUSIC COMMENCES.

52. HIGH ANGLE TOWARDS STERN

The net ropes continue to winch in for a few seconds. Then the top of the net, very near the end of the boat comes to the surface. TENSION MUSIC BUILDS.

53. ANGLE ON JIMMY AND NANCE

JIMMY
Reckon we’re in luck.

54. WATER LEVEL ANGLE

ANGLE is from the side of ramp TOWARDS the water area in front of ramp where the top of the net is being pulled in. This area is swathed in shadow.

55. ANOTHER ANGLE – JIMMY

With one hand on the super-structure, JIMMY is half on the ramp, leaning towards the water.

TENSION MUSIC CRESCENDO’S.

56. BACK TO WATER LEVEL ANGLE

In the deeply shadowed area, inside the pulling-in net, the top of a fin breaks the surface.

57. MED.CLOSE – JIMMY

JIMMY (shouts)
Shit ! Stop ! Stop !

58. ANGLE ON JACK

JACK is looking stern-wards.

JACK
Christ ! (Shouting down ) Shut it off, Nance !

59. BACK TO HIGH ANGLE TOWARDS STERN

NANCY throws the break. The net stops coming in. In the net, just having been pulled on to the ramp, threshing about on top of a the netted fish, is one of the adult dolphin’s.

60. BACK TO JIMMY

JIMMY
There shouldn’t be any round here !

61. BACK TO JACK

JACK (shouting down, tense)
Unhook for chrissake ! Let it go. Let ‘em all go !

CUT TO:
@@@@@@

62. STEADICAM – BRODY HOUSE – INT – EARLY MORNING

STEADICAM FOLLOWS the dressing-gowned, messy-haired ELLEN, into the kitchen. Still half asleep, she puts the coffee on.

A soft thud comes from behind the closed side door into the kitchen. Surprised, ELLEN moves towards the door and opens it.

63. WIDE – GARAGE

The kitchen side-door opens into the double garage. A step leads down from the doorway to the garage level. One half of the rear of the garage has a workbench, and racked tools. The other has shelves on which cardboard boxes are stacked.

ELLEN opens the door and looks at BRODY. He is sitting on a cardboard box at the rear far side of the garage, opposite her. In front of him are two cardboard boxes which he has gone through, full of books and papers; some of which he has piled on the floor. In his hand, dangling over his knee, is a closed book.

BRODY, hitherto lost in thought, looks up when ELLEN comes in.

ELLEN (as a fact)
Bad night.

BRODY nods.

64. VERY CLOSE – BRODY’S HAND

In his hand, BRODY holds a closed book on sharks – one he last looked at years ago.

65. MEDIUM – ELLEN

She sits down on the step and gives BRODY a firm look

ELLEN
Tell me.

66. FULL – BRODY

He sighs, thinks for a second, then speaks:

BRODY
“Why now “, right ?

67. WIDE

ELLEN (matter of factly)
“Guilt”: except that’s not all of it.

BRODY
No…..There’s something else.

ELLEN quietly waits.

68. BACK TO BRODY

BRODY (quiet, reflective)
Forty five years I was a cop……forty five…….

‘Life’s in the details’: somebody said that, didn’t they.
Cop’s are meant not to miss the details.

69. ANGLE ON ELLEN

ELLEN frowns.

ELLEN
Are you saying you missed something. About –

(she finds this subject uncomfortable)

– about what happened ?

70. A CLOSER ANGLE ON BRODY

BRODY finds saying this, very, very difficult:

BRODY
When these nightmares started, I thought it was, you know,
‘I’m not getting any younger’. Alex, his mother, they’re still –

(He searches for the right words)

– …….I havn’t forgotten. I know I’ll take that with me.

71. ANGLE – ELLEN

She nods gently – she understands.

72. BACK TO BRODY

BRODY (lighter for a moment)
I walked the beach this morning – sleepless of Amity.

(A smile flits across his face then disappears)

I’m not that old. It’s not my time yet. I know.

73. ANGLE – ELLEN

ELLEN (nods)
So….what did you miss ?

74. MED.CLOSE – BRODY

BRODY (concentrating)
Something. It’s been sitting here. (He taps his forehead.)

Something I saw…read…some detail that didn’t seem
important then.

But it was.

75. ANGLE – ELLEN

ELLEN
Out of reach.

76. BACK TO BRODY

BRODY
Yes…..

77. MED.CLOSE – ELLEN

ELLEN (rhetorical, properly challenging)
So what would a cop do.

CUT TO:

78. LONG – AMITY POLICE STATION – EXT – DAY

BRODY walks INTO SHOT and up the steps of the police station.

CUT TO:

79. ANGLE ON HENDRICKS – POLICE STATION – INTERIOR

HENDRICKS (a character from ‘Jaws’ – a police Sergeant now in his mid fifties) is standing in the area behind the public desk – his back to the desk – putting a ‘wanted persons’ sheet about a woman, up on a notice board.

BRODY (O/S)
Have you checked her age ?

80. WIDE

HENDRICKS turns around with a smile.

HENDRICKS
Yeah, well even the police make mistakes apparently !

BRODY
Hmm. Is he in ?

HENDRICKS shakes his head.

CUT TO:
82. STEADICAM – AMITY POLICE STATION (a few minutes later)- INT – DAY

STEADICAM MOVES along an empty corridor in the police station, then TURNS through an open door. CAMERA STOPS. The room is a neon-lit, windowless filing room. There are five double rows of shelved box files.

BRODY and HENDRICKS stand in the open area of the room.

83. TWO SHOT

HENDRICKS
Larry Vaughan never bothered with these audit things.

BRODY (light)
Yeah well, if I don’t do it I’ll have one of the Governor’s
assistants crawling all over me.

CUT TO:

84. TRACKING – FILING ROOM ( a minute or so later)

TRACKING CAMERA MOVES down one of the shelved aisles. BRODY COMES INTO SHOT at the other end of the aisle. He walks up it scanning the shelves.

85. BRODY’S MOVING P.O.V

MOVING P.O.V FINDS the dated boxes on the shelves. The P.O.V PASSES various boxes dated 1973, 1974, 1975. On the 1975 boxes, MOVING P.O.V STOPS.

86. REVERSE

BRODY pulls down the first 1975 box.

DISSOLVE TO:

87. ANOTHER ANGLE (BRIEF)

BRODY stands with an open box file, flicking through the individual files inside.

DISSOLVE TO:

88. ANOTHER ANGLE (BRIEF)

BRODY, now with his jacket off, pulls down another file.

DISSOLVE TO:

89. SAME ANGLE

BRODY is now sitting on the floor, his back against the opposite shelf, continuing to flick through a box file.

HENDRICKS (calling O/S)
Hey Martin, you want a coffee.

BRODY
Yeah thanks.

DISSOLVE TO:

90. CLOSE ON BOX FILE

BRODY’s hand quickly takes individual files out one by one. Each file has a person’s name and a number written on the front. He removes three files before he gets to the file marked ‘ Chrissy Wadkins’.

91. FULL – BRODY

He is frozen, staring into the box file. Slowly, hesitantly, he reaches in and removes the file.

92. BACK TO CLOSE ON BOX FILE

The next visible file is headed ‘Alex Kitner’.

93. BACK TO BRODY

With obvious tension, he takes the file out of the box and opens it. There are only five pages. He turns them, one at a time.

94. BRODY’S P.O.V

P.O.V DOWN to file REVEALS all the pages of the file have now been turned. Stapled to the back inside cover of the file is an envelope marked ‘Related Cuttings’. BRODY puts his hand in the envelope and draws out a pile of paper cuttings from the local press.

95. ANOTHER ANGLE ON BRODY

He studies the first paper cutting.

96. INSERT – CUTTING

The headline reads: ‘Boy killed by shark’

97. BACK TO BRODY

He grimaces, then starts to flick through the next six cuttings, increasingly quickly. On the seventh, he stops. He begins to read.

98. CLOSER ON BRODY

Holding the cutting – its contents unseen to us – BRODY’S bodies visibly sags. He closes his eyes.

BRODY (to himself – despairing)
No………..

CUT TO:
99. LONG – EXT – YACHT – DUSK

A small modern yacht glides by WATER LEVEL CAMERA. Its running and interior lights are on.

The ocean is beginning to get choppy. The sky has a strange candescent hue. From far away, the rumble of thunder.

100. MEDIUM – YACHT INTERIOR

Below, in the living quarters, MARCY (a tall, 60 year old in ‘all weather’ gear) is sat studying a chart which is spread out on a retractable chart table. She is using a compass (of the measuring, not bearing variety) to calculate distance on the chart. The radio is on.

RADIO VOICE:
Repeat, developing storm 38 N 42 W, moving south-west
35 knots. Winds 25 to 35 knots. Seas 8 to14 feet within
150 nautical miles.

101. MED.CLOSE – MARCY

MARCY has completed her calculation.

MARCY (to herself, decisive)
Amity, then.

CUT TO:

102. LONG – PETE’S CABIN – EXT – DUSK

BRODY’s truck pulls up outside Pete’s ‘house’ – an isolated wooden cabin, situated overlooking the beach. It is a bizarre abode, made up of an original central cabin with other rooms built on, to no obvious design.

The sky is grey and threatening. It is starting to drizzle.

CUT TO:

103. FULL (a few moments later) – EXT

BRODY, his collar pulled up, walks up to PETE’s front door. He knocks on it. No answer.

He tries the handle, it opens. He calls through:

BRODY
Pete ! You in there ?

104. FROM INSIDE ROOM TO DOOR

BRODY steps in. The cabin is all wood floors and wood walls. The central living area is very bare – just a small table and a few chairs, with a big mat on the floor – but very clean and neat. On the table sits an oil lamp.

On the walls are many oil paintings of various sizes..

BRODY (again)
Hey Pete, you here ?

No answer.

BRODY glances about, his attention going to the paintings. CAMERA PANS WITH BRODY as he walks over to one of the walls and looks at the paintings.

105. BRODY’S P.O.V

The wonderful oil paintings – done in a impressionistic style – are of sea-scapes and fishing vessels.

DISSOLVE TO:

106. LONG. YACHT. EXT. NIGHT

It is raining heavily. The sea is rough. Lightning flashes every few seconds.

107. MEDIUM – MARCY

MARCY sits at the wheel, her hood pulled up, her oils glistening in the driving rain. The wind is screaming.

108. HIGH / LONG – FROM STERN

From HIGH ANGLE BEHIND MARCY, we look up the length of the yacht surrounded by the black, turbulent sea. Lightning flashes. The main sail is billowed to its extreme.

109. CLOSE ON LOW PORTION OF SAIL

The portion of sail, lashed by rain, is stretched to its limit. Suddenly, the lower stitching bursts open, and a small vertical tear appears in the sail. The tear stays small for a brief moment then at great speed starts travelling up the sail.

110. LONG – SIDE VIEW OF YACHT

Accompanied by a terrible tearing SOUND, the tear rapidly travels up the whole height of the sail, leaving half of the sail only securely attached to the top of the mast. The torn sail is immediately caught by the wind.

111. BACK TO HIGH STERN ANGLE

With the torn sail caught by the wind – the sail being blown virtually horizontal from the top of the mast, with its now revealed seam rope still attached to the end of the boom – the yacht immediately is lurched into a precarious starboard sideways list. MARCY is thrown off her seat, and falls against the bulkhead.

112. INTERCUTS – MOVING WITH MARCY

Winded but with no time to spare, MARCY gets herself up. We see now that she is wearing a safety belt with its integral, spring loaded safety line. She immediately hooks herself onto the starboard safety bar which runs along the length of the deck. Battling against the wind, the lashing rain, and the starboard list, she makes for the end of the boom. Facing the boom, she grabs hold of the rope which is attached to both the end of the boom and the bottom of the torn sail flying in the fierce wind high above. She tugs on the rope but the strength of wind against the torn sail makes it impossible for her to pull the rope in.

Still holding the rope, MARCY now turns herself around, so that she is facing out towards the ocean. With both the list, and the rope being blown out at a virtual right angle away from the yacht, the top half of her body is dangling out over the ocean. Putting her other hand on the taught rope she starts to try and pull it in with all her might.

Suddenly the great white shark, jaws open, jerks up from the torrent right below her. In one sudden movement he takes her upper body in its mouth, and the jaws snap shut.

113. ANGLE ALONG DECK

With safety line responding to the sudden jerk, MARCY’S body up to the rib-cage – minus head, arms, and chest – rapidly snaps back inwards then crumples onto the deck.

CUT TO:

114. ANGLE TO DOOR – PETE’S CABIN – INT – NIGHT

The interior is lit by oil lamp. The gale howls outside. Lightning flickers through the windows.

The door opens, rain lashes in. PETE, his oils soaked – and with two hooked fish on hung over his shoulder – enters. He kicks the door shut with the back of his foot.

He looks at the O/S BRODY ahead of him.

PETE (all very matter of fact)
Oh, t’is you Mayor. Thought that were your truck. I ain’t
spotted him yet.

114. WIDE

BRODY gets up slowly from a chair, tense and speechless for a moment. PETE nonchalantly puts his fish on the sideboard, and starts to take his oilskin off. Whilst he does so, he continues:

PETE (cont.)
I’ll come tell you when I do.

115. MED.CLOSE – BRODY

He does not want to say it:

BRODY (very hesititant)
The shark ?

116. BACK TO WIDE

PETE is as unconcerned as ever.

PETE
Shark, aye.

BRODY (exploding)
Christ Pete, why didn’t you tell me !

117. MEDIUM – PETE

PETE turns and gives BRODY a very angry look.

PETE
What you saying ! I came an’ told you the fish gone an’
come back !

118. BACK TO WIDE

BRODY realises he’s made a serious faut pas.

BRODY (apologetic)
I’m sorry Pete, you did. I didn’t understand what
you meant; I don’t know about the ocean like you do.

PETE glowers at BRODY for a moment, then nods.

PETE (rather less hostile)
Reckon I told you.

BRODY
You did. I’m sorry.

PETE thinks about it for a moment, then nods.

PETE
S’alright then. Reckon we’ll have a cup’a tea.

Without further ado, PETE walks off through a doorway.

119. ANGLE ON BRODY

BRODY shakes his head and follows.

120. INTERCUTS – KITCHEN

The ‘kitchen’ – a section of added cabin – is lit by oil lamp. It to, is very neat and tidy. There are more oil paintings.

PETE places a pan of water on the stove.

BRODY enters. He takes a paper cutting from his pocket.

BRODY
I got a cutting here from the Amity Star. From 1950.
About a shark attack.

PETE grabs a loaf – which he begins to cut. (As the scene progresses he sets about pan frying some mackerel.)

PETE
I ain’t no good with dates. You want bread ?

BRODY (making an effort to be calm)
No. No bread thanks.

(Sighs and bites his lip)

You remember two quarterns, right ?

PETE
Aye, two cort’uns.

BRODY looks relieved to be getting somewhere.

BRODY
What about the one before that ?

PETE gets on with his cooking, but laughs.

PETE
I wern’t born ! Don’ know how old you reckon
me, but I ain’t that old. Pa saw it right enough; he were
a young fish’man then, he told me the stories.

BRODY
What stories ?

PETE (matter of fact, as ever)
‘Bout how the shark ate people.

BRODY (less and less able to hide anxiety)
How many people ?

PETE
Can’t rightly say…some. Then was when folk
don’t swim much like as now, for like, having fun
an’ that.

BRODY
And after that, when did the shark come again ?

PETE
Next cort’un.

BRODY
When was that – what date ?

PETE ponders a moment.

PETE
Can’t say. I was a young ‘un. I were fishin’
with pa then. Shark came then and killed
some folk.

BRODY holds up the paper cutting.

BRODY
1950 – two people were killed here by a shark.

PETE
That’d be right then, 1950.

BRODY
And the next time ?

PETE
Well you knows ‘bout that, don’ you. You
an’ old Sam.

BRODY
Quint ?

PETE
Aye. He were a good man.

121. MED.CLOSE – BRODY

BRODY nods.

BRODY (tense, hesitant)
The fish, your fish that disappeared and came back,
it means the shark’s here……The next quartern.

122. MEDIUM – PETE

PETE
Aye. He’ll be here now ‘til Summer.

123. BACK TO BRODY

He looks ashen

CUT TO:

124. MED.CLOSE: ON SIGN – EXT – DAY

The sign, on a hilltop, reads: ‘Wilson Oceanographic Institute’.

The CAMERA MOVES UP AND OVER the sign, to REVEAL a drive winding down the hillside to the sea bay blow. BRODY’s truck is travelling down the drive.

At the end of the drive, on the shores of the bay, is a large, impressive complex of modernistic wood and glass buildings. Moored on adjoining jetties are two high-tech research vessels.

CUT TO:

125. MED.LONG – INSTITUE – INT – DAY

CAMERA TRACKS BRODY and Chief SANDERS (wearing his uniform), as they walk through a warehouse-like, open plan area. It is full of high-tech underwater research equipment – some of which is being worked upon by engineers and oceanographers.

They are accompanied by oceanographer MILLIE (mid-twenties, African-American).

126. PULLING BACK CAMERA

MILLIE ( to BRODY)
We’re doing some pool work. Won’t be long.

CUT TO:

127. ANGLE ON UNDERWATER TUNNEL DOOR

The tunnel door, leading into a pool, opens. Out of it comes a young shark, some six feet long.

128. VERY HIGH / STRAIGHT DOWN TO POOL

The circular pool is huge, lit by underwater lights. At the opposite sides of the big pool, are two smaller pools, each joined to the big pool by tunnels. The young shark has just come out of the right hand tunnel into the big pool.

On the left side of the pool, a diver stands underwater.

The top of the pool is ringed by a railed walkway, reached by stairs. BRODY and SANDERS stand on the walkway watching what is going on in the pool.

On the walkway by the left hand tunnel, stand MILLIE, and kneel engineer JIM (mid- thirties).

129. MEDIUM ON UNDERWATER DIVER

The DIVER wears chain mail over his diving suit, as favoured by those who work with sharks. He has a weight belt and breathing apparatus

He stands on the floor of pool, legs slightly apart for balance. In his hand he holds a handgun- like object – which fires compressed air under high pressure.. Pointing the ‘gun’ down towards the floor, he starts firing it every few seconds. It emits a VERY LOUD THUD, each time it is fired.

130. TOWARDS SHARK

The shark moves rapidly TOWARDS CAMERA. The VERY LOUD THUDS CONTINUE.

131. ANGLE FROM POOL SURFACE UP TO BRODY AND SANDERS

SANDERS is grinning, loving the spectacle. BRODY is shaking his head is disbelief.

132. BACK TO VERY HIGH / DOWN

The shark is moving very quickly straight towards the DIVER.

133. SHARK’S P.O.V

FROM FAST MOVING P.O.V, the DIVER, still firing his LOUD THUDDING gun, is only twenty metres ahead, and closing rapidly. Suddenly there is another LOUD UNDERWATER SOUND of a constant, low pitch, reverberating frequency. THE FAST MOVING P.O.V suddenly changes direction, heading to the right of the DIVER.

134. BACK TO HIGH / DOWN

The shark passes only two metres to the right of the diver, heading towards the left hand tunnel behind him.

135. BACK TO BRODY AND SANDERS

SANDERS is grinning, thrilled: BRODY is still shaking his head, grimacing.

SANDERS
Ole !

136. ANGLE ON TUNNEL OPENING.

Right next to the tunnel opening, an underwater speaker emits the other LOUD UNDERWATER SOUND. The shark passes it, into the tunnel.

137. ANGLE TO EDGE OF POOL

The DIVER, still balaclava clad, comes to the surface at the edge of the pool, and pulls his mask off. It is HOOPER; without spectacles, and with a close trimmed grey/white beard.

HOOPER (as greeting)
Martin.

BRODY
You must be crazy !

HOOPER (as he hoists himself out of the pool)

Swimming with sharks ? That’s rich coming from a Mayor !

BRODY gives HOOPER a good natured ‘oh, very funny’ look. SANDERS grins.

BRODY
This is Chief Sanders.

SANDERS
Chris.

(Shakes hands with HOOPER)

Heard a lot about you.

HOOPER (not missing a beat)
I was young: it was for recreational use.

(That gets a laugh all round.)

BRODY’s smile quickly changes to a nod, then seriousness.

BRODY (laden with meaning)
So ?

HOOPER (casually)
I’m cold. Come on.

CUT TO:

138. INTERCUTS- HOOPER’S OFFICE-INT-DAY

The office is very spacious and well appointed, with one huge window that overlooks the ocean. The walls are covered with large photographs – some of sharks alone, some of HOOPER and other divers underwater with sharks.

BRODY and SANDERS sit next to each other on comfortable chairs around a low coffee table. HOOPER – now dressed in jeans and sweat shirt, and wearing small rectangular fashionable spectacles – strolls back towards them as he reads the newspaper cuttings that BRODY has given him.

HOOPER continues to read, whilst speaking:

HOOPER
Yeah, it’s a common phrase with fishermen, quartern tides
– to do with phases of the moon during the year, y’know.

(BRODY and SANDERS nod)

HOOPER (cont.)
Havn’t heard it used about longer periods.

SANDERS
So is what Pete says possible ?

HOOPER (looking up from cuttings)

Well, we know that long term planetary movements do influence
tides and migration patterns, but the research on the precise effects
is nowhere near conclusive.

BRODY
The evidence on Amity attacks is.

HOOPER (firmly, to BRODY)
Is it ?

BRODY (tetchy)
What’s that supposed to mean !

HOOPER
There were attacks in 1950 and ‘75, twenty five years apart –
that’s certain. But you had further attacks in ‘77 ?

BRODY
Yeah, because of the effects of this quartern thing – these shark’s
carried on migrating up North.

HOOPER (relatively good humoured)

Well shit Martin, I didn’t realise you’d mastered
oceanography AND ichthyology. You should have said –
I’ll stop being so patronising !

BRODY (annoyed)
That’s not what I meant. I meant that seems like a possible
explanation for the ‘77 attacks.

HOOPER sits down opposite BRODY and SANDERS.

HOOPER
Except there wern’t any attacks in the years right after 1950,
were there ?

BRODY makes to interrupt, but HOOPER continues with authority.

HOOPER (cont.)
And what if this fisherman doesn’t have his dates straight. He says
there were attacks in the 1920’s, but he’s not definite which year
between ‘20 and ’29. What if was ‘21 say, not ‘25. What if there
were unreported attacks in other years ? Or attacks in the early part
of the century – not in quartern years – that have got lost in history ?

See, Martin, I don’t think this twenty five year pattern is proved at all.

BRODY glowers at HOOPER

HOOPER (to SANDERS)
And you’ve had no incidents, no sightings, nothing ?

SANDERS shakes his head.

BRODY (exploding)
What the hell’s the matter with you !

HOOPER (irritated, but calm)
I’m a scientist, Martin: I’m being scientific. That’s why
you’re here, right ?

(To SANDERS) Would you make an arrest based on
evidence like this ?

SANDERS, glancing at BRODY, feeling awkward, briefly shakes his head.

HOOPER
Look, what you’ve got doesn’t tell me that there is or will be a
shark in Amity waters this year, or any specific year. That’s my
professional opinion, which you’ve trusted before.

BRODY (a bit desperate)
This is different. There’s no certainty this time. I need proof
that it’s not there.

HOOPER
I doubt that’s an argument which’ll have your council jumping up to fund
an expedition. ‘Cos times have changed, Martin. This board don’t let
me do ‘free of charge’.

BRODY (exasperated)
Alright !…..Alright ! I know it’s thin, I know. But Christ, in a couple
of months it’s summer……

BRODY trails off, staring at the floor, shaking his head. It’s an awkward moment for everyone – a touch embarrassing.

BRODY suddenly looks up at HOOPER, their eyes meeting, BRODY fixes him with a stare.

139. MED.CLOSE- BRODY

BRODY (calmly, with strength)

“My boy’s dead now”…… remember that…… I do.

CUT TO:

140. LONG – RESEARCH VESSEL – OCEAN – DAY

A beautiful, Spring day.

One of the Wilson Institute’s two high-tech research vessels, Aurora II, slowly ploughs through the calm ocean. Trailing on cable some 500m behind, a sonar barge.

141. ANGLE ON DECK (For’ard)

MILLIE leans over the deck railing, holding a rope over the side, which leads down to something presently unseen. She starts to pull up the rope.

142. MEDIUM – FROM OCEAN TO MILLIE

On the end of the rope that MILLIE is pulling up, is a common ‘n’ garden bucket.

HOOPER walks along deck INTO SHOT, over to MILLIE.

143. TWO SHOT

MILLIE has her bucket of sea water in her hand.

HOOPER
Don’t ever tell.

MILLIE gives a questioning look.

HOOPER (cont. – nodding towards all the high-tech gizmos scattered around)

That we can do more with that than all this crap !

MILLIE laughs.

143. ANGLE O/S of BILL (a crew member) FROM BRIDGE DECK DOWN TO HOOPER

BILL (calling)
Matt. Jim wants you.

144. WIDE / MOVING – CONTROL ROOM (A few moments later)

A large control room below decks, full of electronic equipment and displays. TWO OCEANOGRAPHERS sit at consoles undertaking data analysis.

CAMERA MOVES WITH HOOPER as he walks through the control room over to a ‘head up’ TV monitor. On the monitor is JIM’s face – at present he is turned away, talking to someone (we can’t hear the conversation).

HOOPER speaks into a microphone.

HOOPER
Jim.

JIM turns face-on to screen.

JIM
Oh, Matt, hi. We’ve finished section 3. Nothing of note.

HOOPER nods.

HOOPER (a touch wearily)
OK. Let’s join up in section 4.

JIM nods, but with a rather quizzical expression.

JIM
Hey Matt –

HOOPER
Yeah ?

JIM
What the f**k’re we doing out here ?

145. MED. CLOSE – HOOPER

HOOPER (sighing)
A favour……

CUT TO:


146. WIDE – BRODY’S HOUSE (DINING ROOM) – INT – NIGHT

BRODY, with untouched glass of scotch on the table before him, sits at the table which is laid for dinner. He stares into space, lost in memories of something.

ELLEN is chatting / calling through from the kitchen:

ELLEN
You know it’s six years since he’s been over……For your
retirement.

ELLEN walks into the dining room wearing a pinafore, and carrying a bread basket. BRODY is still ‘elsewhere’. She nudges him.

ELLEN
Are you listening ?

BRODY glances up.

BRODY
‘Six years….’

ELLEN (scowling, good humouredly)
Hmm.

O/S HOOPER calls through:

HOOPER (from a distance)
Hi. Ellen ?

ELLEN and BRODY look towards the doorway.

ELLEN
Hey ! Come in.

HOPPER appears in the doorway. He carries two bottles of wine.

HOOPER (deadpan)
I brought red and white: I didn’t know what you’d be
serving.

They all laugh – but BRODY with reserve.

CUT TO:

147. BRODY’S HOUSE (SITTING ROOM) – INT. NIGHT

CLOSE ON THE PHOTOGRAPH of the younger BRODY, HOOPER, and Vaughan.

CAMERA PULLS BACK TO REVEAL HOOPER looking at the photograph.

HOOPER
Wern’t butterfly collars great !

148. WIDE

BRODY and ELLEN sit together on the sofa – glasses of wine on the table in front of them.

ELLEN smiles at HOOPER’s comment. BRODY does not react at all.

149. INTERCUTS

HOOPER turns and immediately spots BRODY’s passivity.

HOOPER
Wanna talk about sharks, Martin ?

BRODY glances to HOOER with a less than friendly expression.

HOOPER (cont.)
Because there isn’t one.

BRODY just stares expressionlessly at HOOPER.

ELLEN
Well that’s great, isn’t it, Martin ?

BRODY just continues to stare at HOOPER.

HOOPER
Well I’m with you, Ellen. I don’t know where Martin is.

BRODY smiles and shakes his head.

BRODY (calmly)
Look, Matt. Don’t think I don’t appreciate you and your team
coming down here – having to spin god knows what yarn with
your bosses.

I hoped you’d find it. That’s what I hoped. You havn’t.

HOOPER looks irked.

HOOPER (irritated)
What’s that mean, exactly ?

BRODY (calm, reasonable)

It means what I said.

You’ve become not so nice a person as the years have
gone on, havn’t you. Or is that more senile shit from me.

ELLEN looks overcome with embarrassment. HOOPER shakes his head, turns and starts to walk towards the doorway.

HOOPER
Ellen, thanks for a lovely meal.
Martin, we’re outta here tomorrow.

HOOPER exits.

CUT TO:

150. LONG: SMALL BOAT. EXT. NIGHT

On the calm black ocean, backlit by moonlight, the silhouettes of a man and a boy sit fishing with rods, in a small boat.

151. TWO SHOT

WAYNE (mid-thirties) and TIM (aged 10), both wrapped up for the cold, sit quietly fishing. WAYNE looks very content: TIM looks completely pissed off.

WAYNE
Told you this’d be great.

TIM (uncertain)
Yeah…..maybe it’s too cold to catch anything.

WAYNE
Nah. Best time of year. When they come, they’re big !

152. CLOSE – TIM

The youngster raises his eyes to heaven, unconvinced.

153. COMMENCING VERY LONG – SHARK’S P.O.V ON SURFACE

The tiny boat is on the horizon. With GREAT SPEED, P.O.V RUSHES TOWARDS the boat. Even when P.O.V /Shark is just upon the boat, TIM and WAYNE do not realise.

The FAST MOVING P.O.V CONTINUES ON (literally) THROUGH THE BOAT, cutting it in half.

CUT TO:

154. MED.CLOSE – SANDERS. POLICE STATION. INT. DAWN

Dawn’s early light streams in through the slatted blinds.

Chief SANDERS is on the telephone. Whilst he looks half asleep, his seriousness is evident.

SANDERS (to telephone)
Yeah, critical condition. They spotted him at Sandy Eels Bay a couple of hours ago.

(Pause – listening)

Ok. I’ll meet you there.

CUT TO:

155. START MED.CLOSE ON MENDEZ . HER HOSPITAL OFFICE. INT. DAY

MENDEZ, in her white coat, sits on the edge of her desk. Like any good doctor, she speaks calmly, softly.

As the SCENE PROGRESSES, CAMERA PULLS BACK TO REVEAL BRODY and SANDERS sitting in front of her.

MENDEZ
The Reeves boy, Timmy, 10 years. Brought in at 05.18 this morning,
found on Sandy Eels beach. He’s suffering from advanced hypothermia.

The family are here. He went night fishing with his Uncle.

156. TWO SHOT – BRODY and SANDERS

BRODY closes his eyes, obviously distressed. SANDERS stays silent for a moment, grim.

SANDERS (dry-mouthed)
Has he said anything ?

157. ANGLE – MENDEZ

MENDEZ
No. He can’t speak.

158. BACK TO TWO SHOT

BRODY eyes stay closed.

BRODY (faltering)

Is he going to die ?

159. MENDEZ

MENDEZ (matter of fact, but sensitive)

Can’t say, Martin…..can’t say.

CUT TO:

160. WIDE – HOSPITAL DOORS (a few minutes later)

BRODY and SANDERS exit the main doors briskly. SANDERS is very urgent and professional. BRODY is half listening, half elsewhere. As they walk across the forecourt, CAMERA MOVES WITH THEM.

SANDERS
I’ll speak to the Coastguard, and have the beaches checked. And I’ll
speak to the fishermen, have them watch out for the body.

BRODY comes out of his reverie and stops walking. SANDERS walks briskly on to his truck.

BRODY (verging on hysterical)

We’ve got to kill the f**king thing !

SANDERS does not even look back, almost at his truck.

SANDERS (calling back)
I want to see Hooper.

BRODY
Hooper ? Christ, he doesn’t give a shit !

161. MEDIUM – ON SANDERS

SANDERS is opening his door. He does not look back.

SANDERS (firmly)
Just get him, Martin !

CUT TO: (Segment 15)

Jaws Sketch, Parody, and Snow Sculpture

by Dave S.

Dave made a sketch of Brody and Quint; it’s the scene where Quint yells to Hooper, “Hooper you idiot, starboard ain’t you watchin it?!”

Dave made a JAWS shark snow sculpture, too.

Dave made an animated takeoff on JAWS in 1983. He called it “Jawed” and the shark is made of plasticine and the boat out of cardboard.

Custom Jaws “Brody” Action Figure

by Chris Llewellyn

Chris Llewellyn made this custom Brody action figure! He always had wished that they had come out with figures based on the JAWS films, and being a toy collector, he decided to make his own. Chris is working on a Quint figure, and hopes to make one of Hooper soon.

JAWS and Spielberg’s Rise to Auteur Status

A reading of the opening of Jaws (1975), incorporating it’s genre and an indication towards the beginning of Spielberg’s rise to auteur status.

by John-Paul Stephenson

Steven Spielberg is now recognised as one of Hollywood’s leading auteurs; a filmmaker who expresses his identity over a body of films. However, when he directed Jaws in 1975 he didn’t have the expansive filmography that he now carries. The film does, though, contain several important elements that would be eventually recognised as part of a Spielberg film.

Jaws is attributed for introducing the concept of the Summer Blockbuster, a marketing device which significantly altered the way films are distributed. The film enjoyed a saturation run in approximately 500 cinemas simultaneously, along with a very intensive media advertising campaign.

Unfortunately for Spielberg and his cast and crew, the film’s commercial success wasn’t an echo of an smooth running production, which saw the film double it’s budget and triple it’s shooting schedule.

The shark was as much of a monster off-screen as it is in the fictional world. Several model sharks were constructed, each for a different movement. As special effects maestro Bob Mattey had been forced to rush the completion of the models, they weren’t tested properly before being shipped to the set at Martha’s Vineyard, resulting in various problems. One model was cross-eyed, another couldn’t close it’s jaws properly, and another sank straight to the bottom. Also, they were designed for fresh water, making their plastic skin evaporate in an adverse chemical reaction to the salt of the ocean.

Due to these immense technical problems, Spielberg was forced to imply the shark’s existence for the first two thirds of the movie using point of view shots and John William’s infamous music. Although these difficulties made filming a nightmare for Spielberg and his cast and crew, they lead to most of the film’s suspense and critical acclaim.

“….that’s when the film went from a Japanese Saturday-matinee horror flick to more of a Hitchcock, the-less-you-see-the-more-you-get thriller.”

Steven Spielberg2

Jaws is often compared to Psycho (1960), and, just as people were hesitant about taking a shower after Hitchcock’s masterpiece, Spielberg made people very cautious about swimming in the sea.

The film’s opening, a synopsis of which is included in the appendix, sets the tone and themes that the rest of the film will follow.

Before the frame changes to a point of view shot of the shark making it’s path along the sea bed, the theme music begins whilst the frame is completely black, signifying the moral darkness from which the monster rises.

It’s power is amplified right from the beginning. The camera, or the shark, increases its speed in conjunction with the music increasing in tempo, demonstrating the incredible speed that the shark is capable of moving. Indeed, the credits, which are superimposed onto the shot, fade in and out relatively slowly, denoting that the Great White’s speed in comparison to human’s is unbeatable. To the shark, which has existed fundamentally unchanged for millions of years, man is only a visitor to earth’s evolution timeline, and the shark must protect his territory.

By using point of view shots rather than actually showing the shark, Spielberg is increasing the film’s psychological impact. The audience is forced to imagine what the shark looks like, rather than be told. “Sublime terror,” says W.H. Rockett, “rests in the unseen – the Ultimate Horror.”3

Both frame and soundtrack abruptly cut to a group of teenagers, who are drinking alcohol and smoking marijuana around a bonfire. The anti-social hour further emphasises the teens’ rebellion against society. Spielberg here seems to be delivering a parental message, in the form of an allegory. Both activities are illegal, and, by disobeying the law and their peers, one of these youths will suffer.

The camera pans across the party, and although they each feel relaxed in their group, the shallow depth of field indicates that they are all individuals. This concept will be reinstated in the second half of the movie when the three protagonists set out to kill the shark, and, in the climax especially, which features one man against one shark. All of the people on the nearby island cannot help him; he is responsible for his own survival, acknowledging the ideology of individualism of American capitalism, repeated in countless mainstream Hollywood pictures.

The setting is the most obvious element of the genre. The scene is set at night, the setting where the majority of most horror movies takes place, severely limiting both the character’s and the audiences’ visibility. In semiotics, darkness is usually associated with evil, from the black hats of the “baddies” in Westerns to the black costume of Darth Vader. In Western culture, outside of the cinematic world, people wear black, or other dark colours, at funerals. Ideologically black is not a sign of well-being, and this last example indicates that it’s a signifier of death, the fate that Chrissie will soon encounter.

Darkness is an excellent device for directors to use to frighten the audience. We fear not knowing what’s going on around us, and our visibility is severely limited at night. In this instance there are only two light sources, the bonfire and the moon. Both of these are quite weak, and the fire source disappears completely when two of the young people, Chrissie and Cassidy, run from the group.

The bonfire being the initial dominant light source is interesting. Fire is another primal component, and has a number of differentiating signifiers. It’s use here resembles the use of fires within tribes; as a safety mechanism, casting away shadows. The teenagers are protected by this light, but their safety is compromised when they leave the proximity of the fire.

However, although it can provide warmth and comfort, it is often used in the visualisation of hell, and the use of the fire could also be read as a warning signal of what is to come. Spielberg is again making us psychologically unstable, keeping us unsure of our enemies identities. Later in the movie it will be the town’s Mayor, who refuses to close the beaches for financial reasons, who is ultimately responsible for several further shark attacks. Spielberg is warning us to be aware and observe the environment around us before committing ourselves to a preconceived safety.

In a wide shot, Chrissie moves from the brightly illuminated, community half of the frame to talk to Cassidy, who is in the darker, isolated section.

We are further startled when the pair run from the party. The juxtaposition between community and isolation is conspicuous, and Spielberg is introducing a structure which will be repeated throughout the film.

“An initially humorous tone is then replaced by an atmosphere heavy with menace and then dissipated entirely by a shark attack.”

Neil Sinyard4

As she runs towards the ocean, Chrissie strips away her clothes, increasing Cassidy’s desire to catch up to her. These two strangers are clearly intending to have sex in the water, though this is prevented when Cassidy passes out.

“Their casual attitude towards sex may seem shocking in the age of AIDS, though in the free-loving seventies, it was accepted as the norm. But even though both kids seem innocent and appealing, it is her naive flower-child promiscuity that leads to catastrophic results.”

Douglas Brode5

Her nakedness not only represents the sexual theme, it also increases her vulnerability; nudity being another recognisable icon of the genre. In most modern horror films, the protagonist is a lone female battling against a vast, irrational force. Although the heroine wears very little clothing, the nudity, as is here, is rarely explicit. The darkness of the night and water maintain Susan Backlinie’s modesty. Visible nudity would compromise a family audience and gain Spielberg a ‘R’ certificate, aswell as violating his own artistic traits.

By having his characters dispose of their clothing, Spielberg is again reducing the elements of the film to the most primal. Nudity represents nature, making the attack into a basic fight between man and fish.

Chrissie is not aware that Cassidy has fallen asleep, and is now totally isolated. She has run such a distance along the beach, and then out into the ocean that the nearby community cannot hear her subsequent screams. She is alone in an unknown world; anything can exist beneath the surface. The possibilities of the terrors is only limited by the spectator’s imagination.

As Chrissie continues swimming, the frame changes to a point of view shot, accompanied by the music which we were introduced to in the opening shot. The implication of the imminent danger that the combination of the music and visual icon represents has already been established, and the audience reaccesses this knowledge having been briefly caught relaxing to the cheerful beach party.

The audience’s expectations are realised when Chrissie feels a sharp pain, and then begins splashing about in the water as she is attacked. What we are witnessing is her symbolic rape by the shark, whose shape loosely resembles a penis, just as Hitchcock’s Birds had to Tippi Hedren. The diegetic elements of the soundtrack, consisting of her screams and pleas of “Oh, God,” resembles that of an orgasm, where the cries are used to express feelings of ecstasy, rather than pain.

The unseen shark thrashes her around in the water, and she eventually clings onto a buoy, making it’s bell ring, in a vain attempt to alert the nearby community. After a final grasp for breath, she finally disappears under the surface of the water, and the frame dissolves to a match shot for the beginning of the next sequence.

A specific genre should be understood, argued Tzvetan Todorov, as an abstract, theoretical and provisional structure but itself transformed by each new production so ‘any instance of a genre will be necessarily different.’6

Because of its Hitchcockian echoes, some critics classify Jaws as a “thriller,” whilst others disagree. Douglas Brode describes Jaws as a “realistic horror movie,”7 and this expository scene contains recognisable iconography of the genre, most of which are primal in a film which will continue to strongly address primal themes.

Her extravagant death is very typical of a genre which is used to very dramatic, physical executions. Very rarely would you see someone poisoned and die peacefully in their sleep, as you would maybe in an early thriller. Horror deaths are much more violent, from Psycho‘s shower murder to the immense bloodshed of the eighties slasher movies.

In conclusion, Jaws doesn’t belong to a solely to a specific genre, instead being one of many films that can be cross referenced; in this case the classification is horror/thriller. Although many of it’s elements do belong to horror, the narrative, thematic and structural qualities and it’s psychological tendencies are more identifiable to Todorov than Polanski.

This extract contains many of the elements which constitutes a “Spielberg movie,” and which reoccur in his future productions. It fulfils some of the criteria which Andrew Sarris8 suggested to qualify someone as auteur, clearly indicating the beginning of Spielberg’s elevation to this status. Spielberg is renowned for his affinity for children, and this extract, with it’s parental undertones, seems to act as a prototype for his subsequent films, especially E.T. – The Extra Terrestrial (1982). Having already introduced to us in the opening shot his most identifiable theme, Spielberg now continues to fulfil some more of Sarris’ criteria.

Sarris suggests that many auteurs regularly acknowledge established filmmakers or films by ‘borrowing’ clips. For example, Hitchcock, whom Spielberg is regularly compared to, paid homage in Foreign Correspondent (1940) to The Odessa Steps sequence in Eisenstein’s The Battleship Potemkin (1925). The way in which Chrissie enters the water, and her briefly peaceful swim resembles Gill-Man’s underwater ballet in Creature From The Black Lagoon (1954).

In a relatively short extract, there are so many other elements which indicates Spielberg as auteur, the most obvious being the continuation of his collaboration with composer John Williams, a working relationship which still continues today.

Jaws also sees the commencement of Spielberg’s collaboration with actor Richard Dreyfuss, who plays ichthyologist Matt Hooper. Dreyfuss has appeared in two other Spielberg movies, Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and Always (1989), and has said that he is sure that they will make many more pictures together.

These elements contribute to what constitutes a Spielberg movie, and his name gives the industry an insurance value, along with the audience a desire to see a film. The ordinary spectator will not consciously be aware of his thematic continuity, but will still expect them to be incorporated into his films.

“[The auteur sign] will signify a set of stylistic and thematic features, which, it is anticipated, will be identifiable in the text of a film bearing the auteur name.”

Patrick Phillips9

An auteur expresses his identity over a body of films, and as Jaws was only his second cinematic offering he was not at this point in his career considered eligible for this status.

Bibliography

W.H. Rockett ‘Perspectives,’ Journal of Popular Film and Television vol. 10 No. 3, Fall 1982

Douglas Brode The Films of Steven Spielberg, Carol Publishing Group, 1995

Neil Sinyard The Films of Steven Spielberg, Bison Books Ltd, Hamlyn Publishing Group, 1987

Patrick Phillips An Introduction to Film Studies, Edited by Jill Nelmes, Routledge, 1996

Christine Gledhill The Cinema Book, Edited by Pam Cook, BFI, 1985

Appendix I – Synopsis of Extract

The opening point of view shot of the shark making it’s way along the sea bed cuts to a late night beach party, attended by 1970’s teenagers smoking marijuana around a bonfire. One of the teenage girls, Chrissie Watkins (Susan Backlinie), catches the eye of a boy, Cassidy (Jonathan Filley).

The pair run from the party towards the ocean, removing their clothes. The drunken Cassidy stumbles and falls as Chrissie enters the water on her own, where she is attacked and killed by a shark.

Notes

1. The concept of auteur theory is problematic, and some critics believe that no one person can be the sole author of a film. Discussion over the term’s existence is not relevant here, and this essay presumes that the term does have meaning.

2. Quoted in Premiere magazine’s “20 Year Retrospective of Jaws.”

3 ‘Perspectives,’ Journal of Popular Film and Television vol. 10 No. 3, Fall 1982

4 The Films of Steven Spielberg, Page 36

5 The Films of Steven Spielberg

6 Paraphrased from The Cinema Book, Page 80

7 The Films of Steven Spielberg, Page 54

8 creator of auteur theory

9 An Introduction to Film Studies, Page 150

The essay as a whole is copyright the author; all known sources are acknowledged

JAWS The Comedy

JAWS The Comedy Contributed by S. Michael Simms

PART I

Why not let Mel Brooks direct JAWS 5? Here’s some brainstorming for the project:

JAWS 5: “This Time, It’s Pointless”

The movie opens basically the same as the original, with the shark’s POV, except that it keeps bumping into things, and there’s lots of silly things at the bottom of the ocean that you wonder how they got there (kind of like I wonder how the hell Quint “saw a shark eat a rocking chair once). The music is the same except instead of bassy horns, the main shark theme is played with a kazoo.

Leslie Nielsen is “Chief Broody”, whose wife is so ugly (like Lorraine Gary) she has to wear a bag over her head all the time, and he ends up not being very upset when the shark, which is in plain view, eats her while she blindly (because of the bag) doggie paddles in the water calling for their son “Mikey”. He has volumes of shark books in his home library for no reason, and we see him flipping through them ostentatiously in one scene, then he screams “Oh my God!” while reading one of the books, and when the camera pans in on the book, we see that it’s a hideous picture of his wife. . .

Mayor Vagisil is played by William Shatner (who was excellent in Airplane! 2), and he is uproariously funny- doing an interview like in the original movie talking about how safe the beaches of “Amityville” (there will be a cameo by the scary house) are, only in the background we see swimmer after smimmer getting yanked under the water while he’s talking. Even after it’s painfully obvious to the rest of the major characters that Amityville has a shark problem, he’s busy trying to book water skiers and dolphin shows, etc. for summer tourist attractions at the beach. He chain smokes like Vaughnn only comically, exaggeratedly so.

“Mott Hoople” is played by Mott the Hoople (so we don’t get sued) dressed up like Matt Hooper, and his main laughs come from the famous “This was no boating accident” scene and his cage scene during which he goes under wearing an outrageous “Ghostbusters” looking scuba outfit, which is so heavy that the line holding the cage snaps and he and the cage sink to the bottom. He also gets a great scene with Chief Broody when they cut open the shark under the dock and are sprayed with tons of cinematic gore . Then he starts pulling ridiculous objects out of the shark’s stomach. When Broody asks “He didn’t eat a car did he?” Hoople replies “Well, actually. . .”

The most hilarious scene will probably be when Broody, Hoople, and Quim (played by a grossly miscast Eddie Murphy) are drinking and laughing together in the cabin. Suddenly, the shark starts bumping into the side of the boat, but every time it does, they take a shot and laugh some more. Then the shark’s head bursts through the side of the boat, into the cabin, and devours a keg of beer. They’re all shocked and stop laughing- waiting for the shark to attack them- but then the shark starts singing “How Dry I Am” and they join in. The scene ends with them in barber shop suits (the shark’s head adorned similarly) doing four part harmony “HOW DRY I AM. . .” before the shark exits the hole and they rush up top to start trying to pin more empty beer kegs to it.

PART II

After the opening sequence with the shark bumping into stuff and “Da Dum, Da Dum” played on the kazoo, the scene changes to a bunch of hippie kids sitting around a campfire at the beach, just like in JAWS. They’re all roasting marshmallows and hot dogs, and in the background, we can see an enormous fin moving around on the ocean. Of course none of the hippies notice.

There’s a real pretty girl (Claudia Schiffer if we can get her) batting her eyes at this guy who’s playing “Row row row your boat” on a harmonica. She starts taking her clothes off and says “I love the harmonica. Let’s go have sex in the water”. The other kids are oblivious to this, naturally. He stops playing and says, “Hey, I’m not that drunk, Jaws could be out there. Besides, I don’t even know your name. Hic.” She finishes disrobing and says “Chrissie. Chrissie Victim.” He replies, “Victim? Is that Italian?” “Nah,” she says, “Vietnamese”. She is obviously not Vietnamese, but the guy replies “Okay, let’s go!”

They start running along the beach, and the guy is havin’ a hard time gettin’ his clothes off, and he hollers, “Hey! Why are we running away from where everybody else is?” She jumps in the water, and we can see the enormous dorsal fin not too far from her. “I don’t want anybody to be able to hear my screams!” “Screams?” the guy asks as he plops down on the beach. “I’m a virgin!” she replies. “Whoah! Lucky me!” the guy says. “Aw shit. Too bad I’m gonna pass out drunk in a second. . .” He then passes out drunk.

Chrissie Victim swims around for a while. The huge fin follows her pretty closely, and there’s a bouy floating nearby. The kazoo starts to play softly, and she looks around nervously- just missing the huge fin as it sinks beneath the surface. She shrugs and starts swimming again, and basically, the scene goes on with the kazoo playing a couple of notes every few seconds, her looking around, and the fin going back under. Real silly, slapstick stuff here, but eventually the shark gets tired of playing around and starts swimming right at her- kazoos playing loudly.

She sees it and screams, “Oh my God! It’s Jaws!” Then the fin goes under, and a couple of seconds later, so does she. She pops back up for just a second and grabs onto the bouy, but there’s this seagull sitting there that pecks at her hands till she lets go, then she’s gone. We see the bouy bouncin’ around for a second, then IT goes under, too; bird and all! SQWUAWWWK!!! Camera pans in on the guy on the beach making out with some other chick, then a nice transition to the House of Marvin Broody, where he is making similarly out with Mrs. Broody, who has a bag over her head. . .

PART III

. . .Suddenly the phone rings, and Broody says, “Saved by the bell!” He picks up the phone, and we hear assorted mumblings that sound like the grownups from the old Charlie Brown cartoons, and he’s nodding his head and saying stuff like, “Really? Oh yeah? Holy Cow! Ya don’t say?” and “What’s a shark?” and “Really? Well bless my ten toes! Guess I’d better check it out then, huh?”

So he gets dressed and drinks a few shots of vodka. His wife’s standing in the bedroom doorway as he gets ready to leave, and she’s mumbling something like “Where ya goin?” (we can’t quite tell cause of the bag over her head), and he slams the bedroom door in her face before staggering outside and hopping into his Jeep. He goes peelin’ out of the driveway and pops a cassette tape into the tape deck- it’s the Theme from Jaws. He’s driving so fast and recklessly that he nearly hits a few pedestrians in his wake, all of whom holler, “Hi Chief!” as he approaches.

After arriving at the station (crashing into a fencepost as he parks), he enters his office, and there in his chair sits an ancient (at least 80) “Polly” smoking a cigar, her spiked leather-booted feet propped up on the desk. She has the phone to her ear, and she’s grumbling, “Nah! He ain’t here! I dunno, why don’t you try the liquor store?” then, “Oh yeah? Same to you, mom!” Then she slams down the phone, and without missing a beat grumbles, “Hey hey, Chiefy. How they hangin’? Old Man Mcgillicutty called a few hours ago, said his picket fences all have “Screw You, Old Man Mcgillicutty” painted on them. Then Broody reaches over and takes the cigar out of Polly’s mouth (a recurring theme in this movie), and he’s like, “What else is new, Polly? Every week it’s something else with his stupid picket fences.”

Deputy Horndicks then enters the office proclaiming, “The body! The body! Oh my God! The body!” Then Broody’s like, “Is that all you ever think about, Horndicks?” Then Horndicks moans, “No! THE body!” and pukes all over Polly in an amazing two and a half gallon display of colors and texture. Polly is understandably upset and starts screamin’, “Son of a bi#ch! You mother#@$er! I’ll kick your f#@%ing @$$!!!” And Broody’s like, “Ohhh. . .THAT body. . .”

Scene changes to Broody and Horndicks arriving at the beach. “Right over there, where all those seagulls and crabs are,” Horndicks points. We see this nondescript guy with a headset standing there with this big bucket of crabs, dropping them one at a time onto the corpse, and seagulls checking out Chrissie Victim’s remains. One of the seagulls flies over Chief Broody’s Jeep and craps on the hood. Broody quickly disposes of it with his pistol. . .

PART IV

After a few pointless moments of close-ups of the body and the camera panning in on Broody’s and Hordicks’ grimacing faces, the scene changes to the two of them back at the station where they are painting signs:

THERE ARE SHARCS TO HERE. DO’NT GO SWIMING OR JAWS WILL EAT YOU. SIGHNED, AMITYVILLE PD DEPT. YOU HAVE BEN WARNED!!!

Polly is in the background smoking her cigar and throwing darts at a picture of Ellen Broody posted on the back wall of the office. She hollers, “The freakin’ coroner called and said she had her leg bit off first, then she was dragged around screamin’ for a few minutes, then she had her other leg bit off, then one of her arms, then her left butt cheek, then she drowned. Oh, and she was a virgin. What a way to go, eh?” as Broody takes off out the front door with the signs.

He makes his way towards the ferry, and as he passes Old Man McGillcutty’s house, the geezer comes runnin’ out screamin’, “Did you see what them little motherfu@kers did to my fence? I want ’em shot dead and put on display, you hear me? Gutshot!” Broody nonchalantly shoves the wizened Old Man McGillicutty to the ground as he passes, and arrives at the dock.

About this time, Mayor Vagisil (who is wearing a tweed leisure suit with the word “JAWS” embroidered all over it), his goons, and the town coroner come runnin’ up, joining him on the ferry. “Chief Broody?” the Mayor asks, lighting a cigarette. “Yeah. Who the hell are you? Broody replies, pulling the cigarette from the Mayor’s mouth and chucking it into the water. “I’m Mayor Vagisil, and these are my goons. We’re concerned that you’re gonna ruin the town’s businesses by posting those signs. It’s your first summer, you know. Peanuts, popcorn, bikinis, beach balls, brown legged girls with heaving…” “Uh, tell him about the coroner’s report, Mayor?” one of the goons pipes in before Vagisil can finish his sentence. “Oh, yeah…uh, we’ve decided you don’t need them signs ’cause the girl wasn’t attacked by a shark at all. It was pneumonia, right Biff?” The coroner glances at one of the goons who is reaching slowly for something in his inside pocket and gulps, “Uh, yeah. I think probably bronchial pneumonia. Yeah. That’s the ticket.” Broody gives the coroner an incredulous look and yells, “Fu@k you! You told me Jaws ate her!” “Tut, tut,” whispers the Mayor, pulling Broody aside. “Amityville is a summer town. We need summer chicks. You yell ‘Barraccuda!’ everybody says ‘Oh shit! It’s a barraccuda!’; you yell ‘JAWS!’, and we’ve got a slew of cheesy sequels saturating the town theaters for the next fifteen years. I don’t think you appreciate the kind of schlock this sort of thing generates. Besides, she died of pneumonia.” The coroner looks around nervously and nods in agreement. “Yeah, okay, whatever,” Broody mumbles. “I need a drink.”….

Jaws Drawing and All That JAWS Parody

by James-Michael Roddy

Michael contributed a drawing he made to celebrate the 20th anniversary of JAWS, as well as a still from the JAWS parody he made, “All That JAWS”. Prints are available of his drawing, as well as video copies of “All That JAWS”. James-Michael is the one in the middle, playing “Squint”!

Click on the images below to view larger versions …
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