Tag Archives: Roy Scheider

JAWS in 30 Seconds by the Cast

Pictures from the Roy Scheider Tribute in Beverly Hills

On April 4th, an event honoring the late Roy Scheider was hosted by his wife Brenda Siemer Scheider and Joshua Newton, British writer-director of Iron Cross, Roy’s last film. The event was held at the Beverly Hills Hotel, and was attended by the stars of Iron Cross, as well as Roy’s children and some of his friends, including Richard Dreyfuss.

More pictures here:

Smile from the Stars: A Celebration of the Life of Roy Scheider

Hollywood Honors Late Actor Roy Scheider With ‘Smiles From the Stars: A Celebration of the Work and Life of Roy Scheider’

LOS ANGELES, March 2 /PRNewswire/ — At the 81st Annual Academy Awards® last Sunday, the late Roy Scheider was memorialized as one of Hollywood’s great actors. As an extension to his tribute in the 2009 Oscar “In Memorium” video, Roy Scheider’s late wife Brenda Siemer Scheider, along with Joshua Newton, British writer-director of Iron Cross, Mr. Scheider’s last film, are honoring the internationally acclaimed actor with an exclusive star-studded event at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Hollywood will toast the late actor on Saturday, April 4 in an evening produced by family friend and director Gordon Hunt, father of Oscar-winning actress Helen Hunt, which will feature appearances and speeches from friends and industry colleagues along with a special surprise performance. The evening will benefit The Myeloma Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

“What would best honor Roy’s talent and determination would be our success in raising money for stem cell research and finding a cure for multiple myeloma,” said Brenda Siemer Scheider.

In February 2008 renowned actor Roy Scheider lost his battle to myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. Coincidentally, Joshua Newton’s father passed from the same disease just several months earlier. Both died during the filming of Iron Cross, a US$30m revenge thriller, in which Roy plays the lead, a character inspired by the director’s father, Bruno Newton. Roy passed just one day short of completing his filming, challenging Joshua Newton to finish the scene Roy had left by using groundbreaking CGI technology. The film is slated to be completed in Summer 2009. Guests will be treated to a special sneak preview of the trailer for Iron Cross at the event.

“I didn’t know Roy had myeloma when I thought of him to play a role which was essentially my father,” states Joshua Newton. “There were many strange coincidences like that which surrounded the production of Iron Cross, in which Roy has delivered one of the most powerful performances of his career. Myeloma has robbed Brenda and I of two people whom we adored and admired and we’re pleased to honor them both at a fantastic event that will raise much needed funds for myeloma research.”

Mr. Scheider has been nominated twice for Academy Awards for “The French Connection” (Best Supporting Actor) and “All That Jazz” (Best Actor). His many films include “Klute,” “The Seven Ups,” “Marathon Man,” “Blue Thunder,” “52 Pick-Up,” “Sorcerer,” “The Russia House,” “The Rainmaker” and most famously “Jaws.” His television work included three seasons of “SeaQuest DSV” and two award winning HBO projects “Somebody Has to Shoot the Picture” and “RKO 281.” Mr. Scheider also received an “Obie” for his role in the Off Broadway production of “Stephen D,” and was awarded The Drama League Award for Best Performance in the Broadway production of Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal.”

For more information or to request media credentials to cover this event please contact Stephanie Samson or Alicia Mohr from PMK/HBH at +1-310-289-6200.

Roy Scheider Event in LA April 4th

From Entertainment Hollywood Magazine:

February 10, is the 1-year anniversary of Roy Scheider’s death and while Hollywood is still mourning the loss of a great actor,- we’re pleased to announce that there will be a big event held in his honor on April 4th in Los Angeles with all of his celebrity friends, “A Celebration of Roy Scheider.” In addition, he also has a film coming out posthumously that will be completed this summer called “Iron Cross” – they’re going to preview the trailer of his film at the event. The event will then be followed by a series of screenings throughout the month of April of Roy’s most famous films.

More details to come!

30 years later, Gulf Breeze still recalls Jaws 2 excitement

This is Part 1 of 4 of a recent series of articles on the making of JAWS 2 by Betty Archer Allen that appeared in The Gulf Breeze News.  Links to parts 2-4 follow the article.  Thanks to Sean for the heads up about the articles.

The making of ‘Jaws2,’ the movie sequel to the mega-hit ‘Jaws,’ might have been old-hat movie making to the professionals involved, but for the residents of Gulf Breeze and Navarre, it was a real happening.

The movie came out in theaters in the summer of 1978. The excitement for the Gulf Breeze area, however, was experienced during fall and winter of 1977-1978 when Hollywood filmmakers and movie stars descended on the Emerald Coast to film the suspense thriller.

So many local lives were affected. Area residents, including students from Gulf Breeze High School, were hired as extras. It was exciting as locals anticipated being seen worldwide on the silver screen.

Universal Studios scouted the Emerald Coast to determine which area was best suited for filming. It found Navarre Beach to be ideal, and the Holiday Inn “Holidome” was more than suitable for film headquarters because of its relatively remote location.

Darryl Lapointe, now President of the Highpoint Hotel Corporation, was general manager of the Holiday Inn at that time. Universal rented 100 of the hotel’s 200 rooms. The ground floor was converted to offices, and some of the Gulf-front suites were remodeled for stars David Brown and Roy Scheider.

“The film cast and crew came expecting to complete the project in a few months and stayed a year,” Lapointe said. “Their room bill was $1 million.”

The Gulf Breeze community became involved when the movie company advertised locally, seeking anyone who was interested in taking part in the movie to complete an application that was provided in some of the local motels.

Photos of the young actors were published in the local newspaper in hopes of finding look-alikes who could act as stand-ins or doubles.

Students — especially members of the band from Gulf Breeze High School — and people who could maintain and sail boats, families who could spend ample time on the beach and local boating businesses participated in the production.

Sequel to ’75 film

‘Jaws 2′ was the first sequel to the ‘Jaws’ thriller of 1975 directed by Steven Spielberg. The primary director of ‘Jaws2′ was Jeannot Szwarc. The film was produced by Richard Zanuck and David Brown.

Parts of the movie, particularly the community scenes, were filmed at Martha’s Vineyard — renamed Amity Island — in Massachusetts. Many of the water scenes, however, were shot locally. Navarre Beach was chosen for the majority of filming because of the mild fall and winter climate and the ideal depth of the water.

Other parts of the movie were filmed from Fort Pickens on Santa Rosa Island to as far east as Choctawhatchee Bay near Fort Walton Beach. Hog’s Breath Saloon on Okaloosa Island, which has since relocated to Destin, served as the teen hangout for filming.

Many of the characters of ‘Jaws’ returned for ‘Jaws2.’ Three major actors resumed their roles: Roy Scheider as Chief Martin Brody; Lorraine Gary as Ellen, Brody’s wife; and Murray Hamilton as Mayor Vaughn. Mark Gruner and Marc Gilpin played Brody’s sons, Mike and Sean.

The plot of ‘Jaws2′ was similar to its predecessor. Scheider’s character, Martin Brody, felt that several recent deaths and disappearances in the vicinity of Amity Island indicated that another great white shark was plaguing surrounding waters again. But as before, he had difficulty convincing the town’s mayor and aldermen, who were more interested in promoting the growth of the area and didn’t want anything to interfere with tourists’ and summer dwellers’ enjoyment of beach and water activities.

The film’s tagline, “Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water” became one of the most famous sayings in movie history.

Universal was able to reuse the molds of the behemoth shark from the first film, but much of the mechanism was ruined from having been left outside. For ‘Jaws2,’ the studio built three mechanical sharks: the platform shark, a fin, and a full shark. The fin and the full shark were pulled by boats.

The company built props to enhance the scenes and make the Navarre area look more like the East Coast. They built a full-size lighthouse prop that looked genuine despite having only one side; a wood-framed skeleton of 2-by-4s supported the building. They also built an island on a floating barge called Cable Junction. It was constructed in such a way that the huge mechanism of the platform shark could go underneath it. This island can be best seen in the final scenes of the movie.

Like the first film, the production was marked by problems. Scheider often argued with Szwarc, which made the atmosphere tense and uncertain. Scheider was not happy about reprising his role as Brody and making the sequel. He disagreed with Szwarc’s directing and was quite open in his differences of opinion.

Locals remember Scheider as being something of a fitness fanatic, working out during breaks.
Szwarc responded that he was trying to make the film to the “best possible” standard, and neither Scheider’s or Szwarc’s feelings were important; only the film mattered.

There were many delays in filming because of breakdowns of the mechanical shark, minor boating accidents and Mother Nature. Shortly after construction of the lighthouse was completed, it was hit by lightning and had to be rebuilt.

Wind and weather conditions constantly changed, resulting in the sailboats getting blown in different directions. There were many days when there could be no shooting at all. But when the cast and crew worked, they put in long, hard hours.

Dollars flow locally

The making of this film was a boost to the local economy because local boaters, extras and stand-ins or doubles were hired. Universal brought in actors, directors, producers and their wives, camera and crew people who needed housing, food and clothing for the movie. Services were needed for laundry, dry-cleaning and recreation.

In 1977, Ed Gray III of Gulf Breeze was manager of what’s now known as SunTrust Bank on Hoffman Drive. He recalled that the bank received a phone call from Holidome management alerting the bank that someone from the movie company would be coming to see them.

An elderly gentleman visited the bank and identified himself as the on-site auditor for Universal Studios. He said he needed a local bank where he could get a $40,000 check cashed each week. The cash needed to be in specified denominations and placed in a paper bag to be taken to the film location and disbursed to each member of the film crew and cast as the per-diem money to purchase meals or other necessities.

This routine went on for many weeks.

“Today and certainly more so in those days, $40,000 was a big sum to be carrying in cash,” Gray said. “The auditor normally would have at least two big guys accompanying him, and he was inconspicuous during his visit to the bank.”

Gray said the two boys playing the roles of the police chief’s sons came to open accounts at the bank. They wanted local accounts for routine spending.

“During the course of the account opening, they began to debate which of them had more acting experience and which one had appeared in more commercials as this was the first movie appearance for each of them,” Gray chuckled.

Continue reading with the links below


JAWS 2 Part II


JAWS 2 Part IV

Jaws 2: Revolutionary for Sequels

Variation has always been the source of much debate during this much scrutinized era of sequels. Before Jaws 2, sequels were primarily made for two reasons: to continue the storyline that was not initially concluded in the first film (Planet Of The Apes, The Godfather), or in the design of the episodic serial (Frankenstein, Dirty Harry, James Bond). Universal decided to do something that seemed improbable– make a sequel where most have failed (French Connection II & Exorcist II). This leaves a crew’s work cut out for them.

Chief Brody is now a disillusioned, paranoid man

Chief Brody is now a disillusioned, paranoid man

Chasing demons from the past in a darkroom

Chasing demons from the past in a darkroom

In 1975, director Steven Spielberg’s Jaws became the most successful picture of all time. The success of the film created a phenomenon that Universal felt somehow had to be continued. Enter Jaws 2, a film that proved more things than the general public knows today or when it was released in 1978. Only this time, no Spielberg and no Dreyfuss, for both were working on Close Encounters Of The Third Kind. So who was going to take over? What was going to make this film special in its own way? French director Jeannot Szwarc was brought on board by production designer Joe Alves who worked with him and Spielberg on Rod Serling’s TV horror show, Night Gallery. Upon winning the director’s chair, Szwarc decided upon a very meticulous and crucial design on how to make this film and what it exactly needed to be.

1. The main character must be emotionally enhanced, more matured, learning from previous film’s events; continuing arc. (you’ll see this later in Aliens, T2, etc)

2. Introduce new conflicts for the characters to face (nobody believes Roy Scheider’s character’s suspicions of a shark).

3. Nostalgia for the previous film must be established giving the character’s history.

4. The story structure and certain elements of the first film must remain in order to keep the audience’s familiarity of why they loved the first film (shark POVS, action elements)

5. Different cinematography or visual look (shooting behind the shark fin, different lighting).

6. Different editing style gives the film a different pace and/or energy.

7. Introduce elements that were not included in the first film or create different situations for the characters (shark is shown a lot to prevent duplicating the first film).

8. Bring back the characters that the audience fell in love with in the first film as long as it respects continuity.

9. Bring back the same musical themes from the original film (John Williams returns to enhance his Academy-award winning themes with new compositions.)

10. Enhance and extend the themes from the original film to bring new life and feelings for the film (Szwarc introduced sophisticated visuals giving an art history appreciation).

A glaring paradox can be noticed. For it all to work, such a film requires to be somewhat similar to its original source of inspiration and yet be different enough to reveal new storytelling possibilities and interpretations. Not easy…

Those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it

"Those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it"

Read more of this article at Mouthshut …

100 Greatest Movie Lines – JAWS is only #41?

Premiere Magazine just put out its list of the 100 Greatest Movie Lines. It’s no surprise that a line from our beloved JAWS was in the list, but only at #41?!?! This is a travesty! Well, at least they said “You’re” instead of “We’re”.

41. “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.” — Brody (Roy Scheider) in Jaws (1975)

Check out the full list here:

Premiere: 100 Greatest Movie Lines

Agree, disagree with their choices?  Post any glaring omissions in the comments.  Personally, I think a line from the The Big Lebowski (1998) should have been in the list:  “Nobody f*cks with the Jesus!

JAWS Lost Interviews from the 1970s

Lost Interviews from the 70s

by Dan Ward/Jake Gove

‘New England Our Way’ TV show (1974)

Thanks to Dan Ward for providing a copy of the 1974 TV program New England Our Way. The program is a fascinating look some at the key people involved with JAWS before it was released. It contains interviews with the “big three” of Scheider, Dreyfuss and Shaw, Steven Spielberg, and Martha’s Vineyard local Craig Kingsbury, who played Ben Gardner. Check out the video clips below:

Please note: Windows Media Player 7.0 is required to view these clips. More info about the player can be found at http://www.windowsmedia.com

Robert Shaw (Quint) discusses filming his death scene.
Shaw on Death Scene

Robert Shaw on what he does between shots to alleviate boredom.
Shaw on Boredom

Roy Scheider (Brody) on the “time it takes for takes”.
Scheider on Takes

Richard Dreyfuss (Hooper), talks about his performance in JAWS.
Dreyfuss on Acting

Chief Brody vs. Moby Dick [YouTube]

Check out this cleverly edited clip from YouTube, it’s Chief Brody vs. Moby Dick:

JAWS Characters: Brody (Roy Scheider)

JAWS Characters: Brody

Roy Scheider (1932-2008) played Amity Police Chief Martin Brody, who came to Amity along with his wife and two young sons to escape the dangers of being a New York City cop. He gets more than he bargained for when he has to contend with a monstrous great white shark. After several grisly shark attacks, Brody tries to close Amity’s beaches, only to be stopped by the town Mayor, who fears that Amity’s tourism would be hurt by such a move. Finally, the mayor relents and Brody joins the expedition to kill the shark, leading to a final showdown.

Mr. Scheider reprised the role of Brody in JAWS 2 (1978), directed by Jeannot Szwarc.

Mr. Scheider has had a number of memorable roles in addition to JAWS. He was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Gene Hackman’s partner in William Friedkin’s The French Connection (1971). He was also nominated, this time for Best Actor, for his tour de force performance in Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz (1979). In later years, Mr. Scheider starred on the NBC television series SeaQuest DSV (1993-1995).

Mr. Scheider passed away on February 10, 2008. He has two films slated to be released in 2008 – Iron Cross and Dark Honeymoon. He also recorded the narration track for the upcoming JAWS documentary The Shark is Still Working (2008). He will be greatly missed by the JAWS community.

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